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Raytheon wraps up JSOW testing on F-35C | Ukraine looks to muscle in on Russia’s mod work in India | Army releases THAAD-Patriot integration contract

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Americas * Raytheon has wrapped up development testing as part of efforts to integrate its Joint Standoff Weapon C (JSOW C) onto the F-35C Joint Strike Fighter. Speaking in a company press release, Raytheon said the low-cost, air-to-ground missile is on track for full deployment in 2019. The latest test took place at the US Navy’s China Lake ranges in California with participation from Raytheon, the F-35 Joint Program Office, and the F-35’s manufacturer Lockheed Martin. “With JSOW C in its internal weapons bay, the Navy’s F-35C can now eliminate the toughest ground targets from significant standoff ranges,” said Mike Jarrett, vice president of Raytheon Air Warfare Systems. * After being delivered to the Marine Corps’ F/A-18 Super Hornet squadrons in February, fighters from VMFA-115 fired the Advanced Precision Kill Weapon System (APKWS) during recent training. The low-cost 2.75 rocket utilizes a laser guidance kit that gives it a precision-kill capability and allows the Super Hornet pilots to maintain a forward-firing, moving-target capability while increasing available ordnance per aircraft and provides a more efficient weapons match versus target sets currently seen in theater. Prior to the firing, the squadron’s crews completed ground training and in-flight training to ensure the weapon […]
Americas

* Raytheon has wrapped up development testing as part of efforts to integrate its Joint Standoff Weapon C (JSOW C) onto the F-35C Joint Strike Fighter. Speaking in a company press release, Raytheon said the low-cost, air-to-ground missile is on track for full deployment in 2019. The latest test took place at the US Navy’s China Lake ranges in California with participation from Raytheon, the F-35 Joint Program Office, and the F-35’s manufacturer Lockheed Martin. “With JSOW C in its internal weapons bay, the Navy’s F-35C can now eliminate the toughest ground targets from significant standoff ranges,” said Mike Jarrett, vice president of Raytheon Air Warfare Systems.

* After being delivered to the Marine Corps’ F/A-18 Super Hornet squadrons in February, fighters from VMFA-115 fired the Advanced Precision Kill Weapon System (APKWS) during recent training. The low-cost 2.75 rocket utilizes a laser guidance kit that gives it a precision-kill capability and allows the Super Hornet pilots to maintain a forward-firing, moving-target capability while increasing available ordnance per aircraft and provides a more efficient weapons match versus target sets currently seen in theater. Prior to the firing, the squadron’s crews completed ground training and in-flight training to ensure the weapon worked effectively. The F/A-18 is the second Navy fixed-wing platform to carry APKWS. It is also employed from the AV-8B as well as rotary-wing platforms including the UH-1Y, AH-1Z and MH-60S/R. The Navy and USMC have fired thousands of combined fixed- and rotary-wing shots and hundreds in combat scenarios.

* Lockheed Martin received Tuesday, April 17, a $200 million modification for continued Terminal High Altitude Air Defense (THAAD) and Patriot system integration work. According to the Pentagon statement, the order covers “Terminal High Altitude Area Defense, Phased Array Tracking to Intercept of Target (PATRIOT), Advanced Capability (PAC-3) missile segment enhancement integration and PATRIOT launch on remote development.” Work will take place at Grand Prairie, Texas with scheduled completion estimated for February 28, 2022. According to a tender published in October 2017, the contract aims to accomplish the development of capabilities in support of THAAD MSE Integration and PATRIOT Launch on Remote; design and implementation of an updated Fire Solution Computer software and architecture; Launcher Interface Network Kit software development activities; and a trade study to assess feasibility of launching a PAC-3 MSE from a THAAD launcher. Earlier this month, the Army announced that the two systems successfully talked in a test conducted by the Missile Defense Agency and the service at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico. During the test, both THAAD and Patriot picked up a live short-range Lynx missile target suing their radars and tracked the target individually, but both systems “exchanged messages through tactical data links and verified interoperability between the weapons systems,” according to an MDA statement.

Middle East & Africa

* Nigeria’s Senate is seeking answers from the government as to why $462 million was released to pay for new military helicopters. The upper house of parliament announced Tuesday that it would invite the central bank governor alongside the ministers of finance and defence to answer for the funding , which Senator Sam Anyanwu claims was withdrawn from the federal account in March and paid to an American manufacturer without the approval of lawmakers. A tweet sent by the senate said “Senate Resolves to invite the CBN Governor and Ministers of Finance and Defense to shed more light on the release of the funds.”

* Two local firms have been selected by the Turkish government to upgrade its navy’s Barbaros-class frigates. The consortium involved—defense electronis specialist Aselsan and military software firm Havelsan—will perform half life-cycle full modernization work that will run to 2025. Anselsan announced that its share of the contract cost approximately $115 million. The Turkish Navy operates four Barbaros-class multipurpose frigates which feature anti surface warfare (ASuW), anti-submarine warfare (ASW) and anti-aircraft warfare (AAW) capabilities.

Europe

* Russian media reports that Azerbaijan is close to placing an order for ten sets of the Belarusian “Polonaise” multiple rocket launch system (MRLS). Based on the Chinese A-200 system, the Polonaise comes rigged on a Volat MZKT-793000-300 8×8 all-terrain chassis. While contracts for the deal have yet to be signed, the Kommersant report says legal documents are in their final stages with just the matter of financing to be concluded. Once finalized, it will be the first export of the Belarusian system. The sale is likely to be met with negative reaction in Armenia—with whom neighboring Azerbaijan has had strained relations—but should be consoled by the deterrent posed by its own Iskander short-range ballistic missile system purchased in 2016.

Asia-Pacific

* A comment piece in Defense News explores the growing relationship between Ukraine and India in the realm of defense co-operation at the expense of Russia. “India, which represents 12 percent of global arms purchases, is critical for both countries, and their rivalry will only intensify,” writes Pavlo B?rbul, CEO of Spets Techno Export, which is a subsidiary of Ukrainian defense company Ukroboronprom. As India looks to foster its growing strategic partnership with the United States, Ukraine has benefitted taking over much repair and modernization of India’s Soviet-era weapons, which constitute an essential part of all armaments of the Armed Forces of India. At present, there are over 400 contracts between India and Ukraine with growing areas including: the modernization of tanks and armored vehicles; modernization of radar and air defense assets; design and manufacture of various vessel classes; supply of components for Indian submarines; maintenance of Indian aircraft and helicopters; and the implementation of joint Ukrainian-Indian research projects. The loss of the Indian market may cause some issues for Russia, who is looking to drum up business in new markets as China increasingly pursues its own domestic defense production.

Today’s Video

* From 2017: AV-8B Harrier fires APKWS in Asia-Pacific region:

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