This article is included in these additional categories:

Daily Rapid Fire

Elta tapped for radar work on Canadian SAR | Israel resumes Apache flights | Griping Bulgarian MiG pilots strike, AF blames weather

For more on this and other stories, please consider purchasing a membership.
If you are already a subscriber, login to your account.
Americas * New search-and-rescue aircraft (SAR) aircraft being manufactured by Airbus for Canada will come equipped with Elta Systems’ ELM-2022A maritime patrol radar. 16 radars will be delivered for integration on the C295 aircraft being procured, however, Elta’s parent company, Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI), did not disclose any further details in relation to the sale. IAI did say that the multi-mode radar will assist in all aspects of the Canadian SAR mission, offering detection, localization, classification, and tracking of targets over water and land in all weather conditions, day and night. So far, 250 ELM-2022 radars have been supplied to customers worldwide in more than 25 countries, and this is the eighth project IAI have collaborated with Airbus on for maritime patrol radars. Costing Ottawa some USD$2.4 billion, deliveries of the new SAR aircraft will run from 2019 until 2022, with the C295s gradually taking over duty from Canada’s six de Havilland Canada CC-155 Buffalos and 13 Lockheed Martin CC-130H Hercules at four bases spread across the country. * Orbital ATK has been selected by Lockheed Martin to produce additional composite components for the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter. Valued at $24 million, the three-year deal calls for delivery of F-35 bullnose […]
Americas

* New search-and-rescue aircraft (SAR) aircraft being manufactured by Airbus for Canada will come equipped with Elta Systems’ ELM-2022A maritime patrol radar. 16 radars will be delivered for integration on the C295 aircraft being procured, however, Elta’s parent company, Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI), did not disclose any further details in relation to the sale. IAI did say that the multi-mode radar will assist in all aspects of the Canadian SAR mission, offering detection, localization, classification, and tracking of targets over water and land in all weather conditions, day and night. So far, 250 ELM-2022 radars have been supplied to customers worldwide in more than 25 countries, and this is the eighth project IAI have collaborated with Airbus on for maritime patrol radars. Costing Ottawa some USD$2.4 billion, deliveries of the new SAR aircraft will run from 2019 until 2022, with the C295s gradually taking over duty from Canada’s six de Havilland Canada CC-155 Buffalos and 13 Lockheed Martin CC-130H Hercules at four bases spread across the country.

* Orbital ATK has been selected by Lockheed Martin to produce additional composite components for the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter. Valued at $24 million, the three-year deal calls for delivery of F-35 bullnose and blade seals, adding to the upper and lower wing skins, engine nacelles and access covers that Orbital already produces for the next-gen fighter. Work will take place at Orbital’s facility in Clearfield, Utah.

* The US Navy has tasked Engility Corp. with providing electronic warfare enhancements for aircraft operated both by the service and the Australian government. The $9.3 million modification adds to a previous indefinite-delivery, indefinite-quantity contract worth more than $39.8 million dollars in award obligations for electronic warfare weapon system modifications to the Navy and Australian government’s electronic warfare aircraft, and will cover aircraft such as the Northrop Grumman EA-6B Prowler, the Boeing EA-18G Growler, Northrop Grumman E-2C Hawkeye, Sikorsky MH-60 Seahawk, Northrop Grumman MQ-4C Triton and the Boeing P-8 Poseidon aircraft. Modifications to the EW weapons system include internal software system upgrades to allow for better threat analysis and sensor intelligence mission data files, along with other enhanced capabilities like signals jamming techniques. Contract completion is scheduled for September 2018 with work to be carried out at Point Mugu, California.

Middle East & Africa

* Israeli military authorities have lifted the remaining restrictions on AH-64 Apache flights following an accident this summer. The IAF Apache fleet had been temporarily grounded in the immediate aftermath of the August 7 crash—which resulted in the death of one crew member—but flights were later resumed under heavy restrictions while a final report on the incident was being compiled. The final report found that the crash at Ramon air base was caused by incorrect installation of a tail rotor control rod after a preliminary report ruled out a previously identified problem of tail rotor blade cracks which caused a temporary halt to operations in July.

* IAI announced Tuesday that the firm has supplied several advanced 3D surveillance and defense radars to an unnamed NATO customer. Produced by the firm’s radar-specialising subsidiary, Elta Systems, no further details, including the cost, of the systems delivered have been disclosed. IAI noted that the radars had been integrated within the national and NATO air and missile defense system, providing close-to-the-force air defense support that can pick up an array of airborne equipment, including low-altitude high-speed fighter aircraft, helicopters, UAVs and low-speed ultra-light aircraft.

Europe

* Despite Bulgaria’s government announcing a new tender to replace its MiG-29 fighter aircraft, Bulgarian Air Force (BAF) pilots have reportedly refused to fly in the the ageing Soviet-era aircraft. The training flights had been scheduled to take place on the morning of October 24 from Graf Ignatievo Air Force Base, and BAF brass later attributed the cancelled flights to bad weather. But media reports cite a mixture of safety concerns and low morale for the stand down, and pilots are said to be unhappy over Sofia’s delay in choosing a new fighter after ditching an interim government’s decision to move ahead with purchasing Saab’s JAS-39 Gripen aircraft. The government meanwhile, accused a rabble rouser of “artificially creating tension” among the pilots and that the Defense Ministry was looking into the situation.

Asia Pacific

* Japan needs a long-range strike capability, according to a piece from RAND political scientist, Jeffrey W. Hornung. Arguing that Japanese governments since the Ichiro Hatoyama administration (1952) had agreed in theory that the constitution allows Japan to strike enemy missile sites, Hornung suggested that now “may be time to move beyond the theoretical,” and move forward with procuring the munitions in order to boost its deterrence capabilities, removing the pressure on its two-tiered ballistic missile defense system. He added that in order to fill in the gaps, Tokyo could proceed with plans to purchase the land-based Aegis Ashore system and deploy more advanced missile interceptors for Japan’s sea-based and land-based systems, adding range, altitude and accuracy.

* India completed Tuesday an Indian Air Force (IAF) drill that saw the touchdown of 20 military aircraft on the Agra-Lucknow Expressway. Aircraft involved in the exercise included Mirage 2000, Su-30MKI and Jaguar fighter aircraft, as well as An-32 and the C-130J Super Hercules transport aircraft. The Super Hercules landing, the first of its kind on the highway, saw commandos exit the aircraft and take positions on either side of the makeshift airstrip to cordon if off for fighter operations.

Today’s Video

* Indian Super Hercules lands on Agra-Lucknow Expressway:

One Source: Hundreds of programs; Thousands of links, photos, and analyses

DII brings a complete collection of articles with original reporting and research, and expert analyses of events to your desktop – no need for multiple modules, or complex subscriptions. All supporting documents, links, & appendices accompany each article.

Benefits

  • Save time
  • Eliminate your blind spots
  • Get the big picture, quickly
  • Keep up with the important facts
  • Stay on top of your projects or your competitors

Features

  • Coverage of procurement and doctrine issues
  • Timeline of past and future program events
  • Comprehensive links to other useful resources