Pakistan Wants to Buy MRAPs Ahead of Modi State Visit in the US

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* The US has been struggling to figure out what to do with its MRAPs in Afghanistan for about a year. The State Department is now confirming that Pakistan is requesting a Foreign Military Sale of 160 MaxxPros for about $198 million, an idea first floated back in April. It shows the US is holding no grudge for Pakistan’s significant contribution to high logistics costs out of Afghanistan, but the price tag makes this putative sale far from a gift. Most of these vehicles have likely been ridden hard. UPDATE: after a 2nd reading of the DSCA release, it is unclear whether these vehicles are used or new, and we may just have leaped to conclusions here. DID will further update when we find out. * If India’s Prime Minister Modi objects to Pakistan buying used MRAPs, the US will find out soon enough as he’ll visit President Obama later this week. US Chief of Naval Operations Admiral Jonathan Greenert hopes [Reuters] that “stalled” defense cooperation with India can resume. Foreign Policy lists many areas where the interests of the two countries can align, including in Afghanistan. * Soon after the Philippines and the US signed a military agreement establishing […]

* The US has been struggling to figure out what to do with its MRAPs in Afghanistan for about a year. The State Department is now confirming that Pakistan is requesting a Foreign Military Sale of 160 MaxxPros for about $198 million, an idea first floated back in April. It shows the US is holding no grudge for Pakistan’s significant contribution to high logistics costs out of Afghanistan, but the price tag makes this putative sale far from a gift. Most of these vehicles have likely been ridden hard. UPDATE: after a 2nd reading of the DSCA release, it is unclear whether these vehicles are used or new, and we may just have leaped to conclusions here. DID will further update when we find out.

* If India’s Prime Minister Modi objects to Pakistan buying used MRAPs, the US will find out soon enough as he’ll visit President Obama later this week. US Chief of Naval Operations Admiral Jonathan Greenert hopes [Reuters] that “stalled” defense cooperation with India can resume. Foreign Policy lists many areas where the interests of the two countries can align, including in Afghanistan.

* Soon after the Philippines and the US signed a military agreement establishing the return of American troops, activists challenged its legality [The Guardian] for lack of Senate approval. The WSJ reports that the case may be rejected eventually given precedents, but it may take years for the legal system to come to that conclusion.

Middle East

* Reuters: Turkey struggles with spillover as Syrian Kurds battle Islamic State.

* Al Jazeera: Turkey’s ISIL crisis is worse than you think.

* New Yorker: ISIS vs the Kurds – The Fight of Their Lives.

* WaPo: U.S. expands war against Islamic State with airstrikes in Syria.

* NYT: Weeks of U.S. Strikes Fail to Dislodge ISIS in Iraq.

* Saudi Arabia, the UAE, Jordan and Bahrain are involved in strikes in Syria, with Qatar playing a supporting role, according to First Post.

US DFARS on MYP

* The Pentagon is considering changing defense regulations for large multi-year contracts by forcing their specific authorization in a law separate from an appropriations act, among changes that seem to put even more contract management power into Congressional hands. Comments can be sent until Nov. 18 before the rule is finalized.

AFA Air Conference 2014

* The Air Force Association’s Air & Space Conference that took place last week is available as a series of video here. Among them, today’s video features Maj. Gen. Thomas Masiello, the commander of the Air Force Research Laboratory, who explained what the AFLR is up to, from hypersonics to directed energy. 22 minutes in, there’s a nice jab at the Navy’s UCLASS winning an award he was coveting for the X-51 scramjet:

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