US Resets to the Fact Putin Won’t Play Nice

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* Ukraine’s president said Russian forces issued an ultimatum on Crimea, after blockading Ukrainian forces in the region. * A Rear Admiral just appointed to lead the Ukrainian navy swore allegiance to “the residents of the Autonomous Republic of Crimea”, which really means he defected to Russia. Of course the Russians swear all they’re doing is defending human rights. Which is also the purpose of live fire exercises in the Kaliningrad exclave. * The Obama administration is putting together a list of travel and financial restrictions they could enact against Russian officials, while the Russian stock market is taking a nosedive. * NATO’s Secretary General’s statement (video): “We condemn Russia’s military escalation in Crimea. We express our grave concern regarding the authorisation, by the Russian Parliament, of the use of the armed forces of the Russian Federation on the territory of Ukraine. * China clarifies its stance: they have no stance. They don’t want to look like they are meddling with the “internal affairs” of other countries. Don’t ask how that’s possibly relevant to the current situation in Ukraine. Meanwhile, China keeps pushing against the international norms regulating territorial disputes. * In a 1994 Memorandum, the US, Russia, and the […]

* Ukraine’s president said Russian forces issued an ultimatum on Crimea, after blockading Ukrainian forces in the region.

* A Rear Admiral just appointed to lead the Ukrainian navy swore allegiance to “the residents of the Autonomous Republic of Crimea”, which really means he defected to Russia. Of course the Russians swear all they’re doing is defending human rights. Which is also the purpose of live fire exercises in the Kaliningrad exclave.

* The Obama administration is putting together a list of travel and financial restrictions they could enact against Russian officials, while the Russian stock market is taking a nosedive.

* NATO’s Secretary General’s statement (video):

“We condemn Russia’s military escalation in Crimea. We express our grave concern regarding the authorisation, by the Russian Parliament, of the use of the armed forces of the Russian Federation on the territory of Ukraine.

* China clarifies its stance: they have no stance. They don’t want to look like they are meddling with the “internal affairs” of other countries. Don’t ask how that’s possibly relevant to the current situation in Ukraine. Meanwhile, China keeps pushing against the international norms regulating territorial disputes.

* In a 1994 Memorandum, the US, Russia, and the UK affirmed their commitment “to respect the independence and sovereignty and the existing borders of Ukraine.”

* While many observers, mostly in American media, seem taken aback by Russia’s behavior in Ukraine as if it was not right out of their playbook, DID in July 2012: “Introducing Spice de Cold War, by Vladimir.”

* Stars & Stripes describes the struggle to downsize EUCOM.

Capacity Sustainment While Facing GCV Termination, UAV Budget Shrinkage

* The US Army is under pressure to downsize industrial capacity as funding for new vehicles dwindles.

* The CSIS think tank asks what it will take to sustain the U.S. lead in Unmanned Systems [PDF].

Another Indian Corruption Investigation

* India’s defence ministry asked the Central Bureau of Investigation to look into bribery allegations against Rolls-Royce in connection with contracts to supply aircraft engines to state-owned Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (HAL).

Mabus on Platforms, Service Contracts, and More

* CSIS hosted US Navy Secretary Ray Mabus last Friday to talk about the value of presence and other topics (apart from the FY15 budget, which was off limits). Video below:

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