Rapid Fire July 31, 2013: Meet the Airbus Group (Formerly EADS)

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* EADS announced revenue up 6% to 26.3 billion ($34.9B) for the 1st half of 2013. Defense grew by 3% to 5 billion euros ($6.6B). Confirming recent reports, the group is taking the Airbus name, and regrouping its defense activities under the Airbus Defence & Space division. Headquartered in Munich, Airbus D&S will account for 45,000 employees and 14 billion euros in yearly revenue. However military helos will be handled with their civilian brethren under the separate Airbus Helicopters. * The Pentagon released its latest report [PDF] on progress toward security and stability in Afghanistan. Beyond some arguing about which metrics should be used to measure progress, its charts show Taliban seasonal attack patterns of clockwork regularity, though the authors think such tactical persistence does not translate into strategic gains. The “good news”, if you’re very cynical: it’s increasingly Afghan forces getting killed now rather than ISAF troops. Of course the Administration has a more positive spin on it. * Meanwhile, a dose of unvarnished reality: the United Nations Assistance Mission in Afghanistan reports a sharp increase in civilian casualties in the country, after a decline last year. * If congressional insider baseball is your thing, it doesn’t get any […]

* EADS announced revenue up 6% to 26.3 billion ($34.9B) for the 1st half of 2013. Defense grew by 3% to 5 billion euros ($6.6B). Confirming recent reports, the group is taking the Airbus name, and regrouping its defense activities under the Airbus Defence & Space division. Headquartered in Munich, Airbus D&S will account for 45,000 employees and 14 billion euros in yearly revenue. However military helos will be handled with their civilian brethren under the separate Airbus Helicopters.

* The Pentagon released its latest report [PDF] on progress toward security and stability in Afghanistan. Beyond some arguing about which metrics should be used to measure progress, its charts show Taliban seasonal attack patterns of clockwork regularity, though the authors think such tactical persistence does not translate into strategic gains. The “good news”, if you’re very cynical: it’s increasingly Afghan forces getting killed now rather than ISAF troops. Of course the Administration has a more positive spin on it.

* Meanwhile, a dose of unvarnished reality: the United Nations Assistance Mission in Afghanistan reports a sharp increase in civilian casualties in the country, after a decline last year.

* If congressional insider baseball is your thing, it doesn’t get any better than this: National Review looks behind the scenes in the GOP over the Conyers-Amash NSA amendment.

* DARPA’s Tactical Technology Office (TTO) organizes an Industry Day on August 5 in Laurel, MD, to present its Hydra modular unmanned undersea system.

* Harris reported revenue down 6.2% to $5.11B for their full fiscal year 2013. In the 4th quarter Tactical Communications sales were down by 18%.

* General Dynamics Information Technology plans to open an IT customer service center in Bogalusa, LA, and staff it with 600 people.

* Brazil’s federal government recently announced a 10 billion reais (~$4.4B) spending freeze meant to lead to a primary surplus. The ministry of defense is one of the two most affected parts of the administration, but they seem to have been caught flatfooted and don’t quite know where to cut. Shorten the hours worked on Fridays has been floated as one possibility. This will sound familiar to our furlough-facing American readers. Reuters on the budget | Valor Econômico | Globo [both in Portuguese].

* Deficit reduction is also behind Malaysia’s non-decision so far to choose a replacement for its MiG-29Ns.

* Here’s a detailed look at the reasons behind the Philippines’ decision to relocate air force and naval bases to the Subic Bay.

* Today’s video below shows the UK cramming its final Merlin helicopter into a C-17 to ship it out of Afghanistan:

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