Iraqi Security Forces Order of Battle, July 2011

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(c) DJ Elliott(click to view full) DJ Elliott is a retired USN Intelligence Specialist (22 years active duty) who has been analyzing and writing about Iraqi Security Forces developments since 2006. His Iraqi Security Forces Order of Battle is an open-source compilation that attempts to map and detail Iraqi units and equipment, as their military branches and internal security forces grow and mature. While “good enough for government use” is not usually uttered as a compliment, US Army TRADOC has maintained permission to use the ISF OOB for their unclassified handouts since 2008. This compilation is reproduced here with full permission. It offers a set of updates highlighting recent changes in the ISF’s composition and development, followed by the full updated ISF OOBs in PDF format. Reader feedback and tips are encouraged. Recent developments include: This Iraqi Security Force (ISF) update provides a summary of changes to the ISF during June 2011. The Iraqi Security Force Order of Battle is updated as of June 30/11. Highlights in this update include: * Golden Lions are now a battalion-sized force. * 5th Division mechanizing; The first 2 divisional artillery battalions may have been identified receiving M198 training; The fifth cycle of battalion […]
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(c) DJ Elliott
(click to view full)

DJ Elliott is a retired USN Intelligence Specialist (22 years active duty) who has been analyzing and writing about Iraqi Security Forces developments since 2006. His Iraqi Security Forces Order of Battle is an open-source compilation that attempts to map and detail Iraqi units and equipment, as their military branches and internal security forces grow and mature. While “good enough for government use” is not usually uttered as a compliment, US Army TRADOC has maintained permission to use the ISF OOB for their unclassified handouts since 2008.

This compilation is reproduced here with full permission. It offers a set of updates highlighting recent changes in the ISF’s composition and development, followed by the full updated ISF OOBs in PDF format. Reader feedback and tips are encouraged. Recent developments include:

MNF-I Logo

This Iraqi Security Force (ISF) update provides a summary of changes to the ISF during June 2011. The Iraqi Security Force Order of Battle is updated as of June 30/11. Highlights in this update include:

* Golden Lions are now a battalion-sized force.
* 5th Division mechanizing; The first 2 divisional artillery battalions may have been identified receiving M198 training; The fifth cycle of battalion training in external defense has completed; 14th Division’s logistics force may be reorganizing.
* Oil-for-Aircraft deal for Korean jet trainers?; 4 Mi-171s received; Contract for maintenance and support may be made through US FMS.

Peshmerga

Peshmerga Mosul

Peshmerga, Mosul
(click to view full)

The “Golden Lions” Combined Security Force at Kirkuk is now a battalion-sized force. Iraqi Army, Iraqi Police, Kurdish Security Forces, and American Soldiers established the CSF in 2009 as a combined unit with the mission of working together to provide security in the area surrounding Kirkuk City.

“In 2009 you established a company-sized formation,” said Col. Michael Pappal, commander, 1st Advise and Assist Task Force, 1st Infantry Division, during his remarks. “Today, we are all here, witnessing your growth from a company to a battalion under American advisement, not control.”

The Kurdish 1st Regional Guards Brigade continues to train at Kirkuk.

Iraqi Army

M113A3 Modified in Iraq

US M113A3, Iraq
(click to view full)

The Iraqi Army’s 5th Division is mechanizing:

“Iraqi army soldiers selected from four brigades of 5th IA Division conducted operator training on the M113 Armored Personnel Carrier vehicle with assistance from U.S. soldiers from 2nd Advise and Assist Brigade, 25th Infantry Division at Kirkush Military Training Base, Iraq, April 27. During the M113 training cycle, focused on training the IA on becoming master drivers and vehicle maintenance specialists, students learned basic operating procedures and vehicle maneuvering skills, as well as troubleshooting vehicle malfunctions.”

The tanks to go with the M113s have not been identified but, they are probably T-72s from the 9th Division, where they are being replaced with American M1A1s.

BAE Systems received a $14.2 million contract to provide field service representatives, who will train the Iraqi crews and units for their forthcoming 1,026 refurbished M113A2 variants and 21 refurbished M88A1 Hercules recovery vehicles. See June 2011 ISF OOB for detailed breakdowns of vehicle types.

M198 Fallujah

USMC M198, Fallujah
(click to view full)

The first Iraqi Army divisional artillery has been identified:

“Iraqi army soldiers assigned to 5th IA Division’s newly formed 105th Field Artillery Regiment practiced crew drills on their M198 155mm howitzers at Kirkush Military Training Base, Iraq, May 9. U.S. soldiers from 2nd Battalion, 11th Field Artillery Regiment, 2nd Advise and Assist Brigade, 25th Infantry Division instructed the Iraqi soldiers during a dedicated field artillery training course at KMTB as the gun crews become the foundation of the growing IA field artillery corps.”

Another divisional field artillery regiment has been reported near Mosul with M198s. The Washington Post’s reporting says this battalion is with 2nd Division, but the division ID might be in error. The adjacent 3rd Division has been using 2nd Division’s training areas and is receiving training and upgrade to perform external security.

The IA 3rd, 5th, 7th, and 10th Divisions completed their fifth cycle of battalion training in external defense during June. Only the 1-10/3 Battalion was specifically identified in this training cycle.

The 14th Division’s Motor Transport Regiment is still reported as the “14th Provision Transportation Command“. This indicates that the MTR is still considered a temporary formation and that the 14th Division plans to establish brigade support battalions in the near future. The only division in the IA with BSBs does not have an MTR – the transport elements are split among the BSBs.

Iraqi Aviation

C-208B IqAF

IqAF C-208B
(click to view full)

Jane’s reports that the Iraqis may have made an oil-for-aircraft deal to buy Korean T-50 family jet trainers, some of which could also serve as effective light fighters. If so, this indicates serious budget issues, and makes the reported deal for Aero Vodochody L159T jet trainers questionable. Will the L-159’s potential Iraq deal become yet another canceled Czech?

The Iraqi Army Air Corps now has 22 Mi-171 medium helicopters, following the requisite sheep’s blood dedication ceremonies at Camp Taji.

The Iraqis are also undertaking munitions training, so they can operate the armed Mi-17 versions safely. That’s actually a cultural shift for the IqAF, which has often seen safety as an American preoccupation.

The Government of Iraq has requested multi-year support for most of its American fixed-wing aircraft. Aircraft covered include Cessna’s 172s, TC-208 Caravan trainers and AC-208 Combat Caravan light ISR/attack planes; and HawkerBeechcraft’s twin-engine King Air 350 ISR/light transports and T-6A intermediate trainers. The contract could be worth over $600 million; read “IqAF Seeks to Support Its US-Made Light Air Fleet” for full coverage.

Iraqi Navy and Marines

No updates this month.

Ministry of Interior

No updates this month.


Originally published by DJ Elliott at Montrose Toast. The July 2011 report is reproduced here with permission. Comments and corrections to these materials are encouraged, please use this link.


Additional Readings: Full ISF OOB

* Page 1: Iraqi National Operational Command (NOC)/Joint Forces Command (JFC) [PDF]

* Page 2: Iraqi Army Quick Reaction Forces (QRF) [PDF]

* Page 3: Iraqi Army Northern Forces [PDF]

* Page 4: Iraqi Army Central Forces [PDF]

* Page 5: Iraqi Army Southern Forces [PDF]

* Page 6: Iraqi Air Force (IZAF) [PDF]

* Page 7: Iraqi Navy (IZN) and Marine Corps (IZM) [PDF]

* Page 8: Counter-Terrorism Bureau and Commands [PDF]

* Page 9: Joint Operational Commands [PDF]

* Pages 10-14: Ministry of Interior (MOI)
** MOI Core Units and Emergency Response Force [PDF]
** Iraqi National Police and Provincial [PDF]
** Department of Border Enforcement et. al. [PDF]
** MoI Emergency Police [PDF]
** Oil Police Directorate [PDF]

* Appendix A: Definitions & Acronyms
* Appendix B: ISF Standard Tables of Organization
* Appendix C: ISF Equipment
* Appendix D: Related Articles & Monthly Updates
* Appendix E: 2007 Notes
* Appendix F: 2008 Notes
* Appendix G: 2009 Notes
* Appendix H: 2010 Notes
* Appendix I: 2011 Notes

Additional Readings: DID Articles

Note that the ISF OOB often tracks developments that DID’s articles cannot, until official confirmation exists. On the other hand, DID articles can offer a drill-down into key contracts and their associated developments and background, via an easily-accessible organizing principle. As such, it’s best to treat these sources as separate but complementary. DID thanks DJ Elliott for his frequent assistance, which is credited in many of these articles.

* DID – Iraq Seeks F-16 Fighters

* DID – TA-50 Golden Eagles for Iraq? Looks like Czech L-159Ts instead.

* DID – Czech L-159s: Cheap to Good Home. Could that home be in Iraq?

* DID – Iraq Orders C-130Js

* DID – The Penny Drops: Iraq Chooses its COIN Aircraft. And trainers.

* DID – Standing Up the IqAF: King Air 350s. Iraq’s top reconnaissance asset, now adopted by the USA. Iraq’s are reportedly slated to be armed.

* DID – Bird Dogs for the Iraqi Air Force. Some of them have teeth, now.

* DID – Medium Mainstay: Mi-17s for Iraq

* DID- Iraq Seeks Armed Reconnaissance Helicopters

* DID – Iraq Orders Eurocopter’s EC635s. Since confirmed as light attack birds.

* DID – Iraq Looking for More Light/Med. Utility Helicopters

* DID – IqAF Seeks to Support Its US-Made Light Air Fleet

* DID – Iraq Orders a Long-Range Radar. The 2nd of 4 planned.

* DID – M1 Abrams Tanks for Iraq

* DID – Ukraine, Iraq in $2.5 Bn Weapons Deal

* DID – Iraq: Looking for LAVs in All the Right Places. It appears that the Strykers were ordered, and the LAV-25s were not.

* DID – BAE Delivering a Cougar Variant for Iraq’s ILAV Contract. Iraq’s ILAV/ Badger MRAP. Supplemented by locally-produced Reva vehicles, which are another design.

* DID – Iraq Acquiring Artillery-Finder Radars

* DID – Bittersweet Symphony: Lockheed & A-V Deliver Anti-IED Devices. Some of these orders have been Iraqi.

* DID – December 2008: Small Arms for Iraq

* DID – Command Tents and C3 for Iraq

* DID – Iraq Looking for Radios to Equip Its Federal Police

* DID – Iraq Asks for USACE Help With Military Infrastructure

* DID – Iraq to Purchase $1.05B in Medical Items

* DID – Swiftships to Build Up Iraqi Navy’s Coastal Patrol Capabilities

* DID – Iraq Looks to Buy Maritime Awareness Systems

* DID (Nov 29/09) – AECOM Gets 6-Month Extension to Iraqi Security Forces Maintenance Contract

* DID (June 11/09) – Non-Standard Ammo Orders for Iraq

* DID (Sept 25/08) – Standing Up Iraq’s MoD: A British Snapshot

* DID (Feb 14/08) – VSE, Westar to Help Train Iraqi Pilots

* DID (Oct 7/07) – $2.257B for Iraqi Army Guns, Vehicles & Logistics. Includes their DSCA request for BTR-3E1s, but they ended up in a separate deal for BTR-4s.

* DID (Aug 27/07) – Iraq Requests Another 16 Huey-II Helicopters

* DID (Nov 21/05) – Iraq Receives T-72s & BMPs – With Another Armored Brigade Planned

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