SSDS: Quicker Naval Response to Cruise Missiles

LHA-R

LHA-R/NAAS Concept
(click to view full)

August 19/19: Engineering Support Lockheed Martin won a $56 million deal for combat system engineering support on the Ship Self-Defense System (SSDS). Under the contract, the SSDS combat system engineering agent and software design agent primary deliverables will be SSDS tactical computer programs, program updates and associated engineering, development and logistics products. The contract will manage the in-service SSDS configurations as well as adapt and integrate new or upgraded war-fighting capabilities. Lockheed will perform work in Moorestown, New Jersey and San Diego, California. Estimated completion date is in December.

 

For more on this and other stories, please consider purchasing a membership.
If you are already a subscriber, login to your account.
(click to view full) Right now, in many American ships beyond its Navy’s top-tier AEGIS destroyers and cruisers, the detect-to-engage sequence against anti-ship missiles requires a lot of manual steps, involving different ship systems that use different displays. When a Mach 3 missile gives you 45 seconds from appearance on ship’s radar to impact, seconds of delay can be fatal. Seconds of unnecessary delay are unacceptable. Hence Raytheon’s Ship Self Defense System (SSDS), which is currently funded under the US Navy’s Quick Reaction Combat Capability program. It’s widely used as a combat system in America’s carrier and amphibious fleets. That can be challenging for its developers, given the wide array of hardware and systems it needs to work with. Consistent testing reports indicate that this is indeed the case, and SSDS has its share of gaps and issues. It also has a series of upgrade programs underway, in order to add new capabilities. Managing these demands effectively will have a big impact on the survivability of the US Navy’s most important power projection assets. SSDS: Current Versions Role & Ship Types CEC Concept (click to enlarge) SSDS uses software and commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) electronics to turn incoming data from several […]

SSDS

(click to view full)

Right now, in many American ships beyond its Navy’s top-tier AEGIS destroyers and cruisers, the detect-to-engage sequence against anti-ship missiles requires a lot of manual steps, involving different ship systems that use different displays. When a Mach 3 missile gives you 45 seconds from appearance on ship’s radar to impact, seconds of delay can be fatal. Seconds of unnecessary delay are unacceptable.

Hence Raytheon’s Ship Self Defense System (SSDS), which is currently funded under the US Navy’s Quick Reaction Combat Capability program. It’s widely used as a combat system in America’s carrier and amphibious fleets. That can be challenging for its developers, given the wide array of hardware and systems it needs to work with. Consistent testing reports indicate that this is indeed the case, and SSDS has its share of gaps and issues. It also has a series of upgrade programs underway, in order to add new capabilities. Managing these demands effectively will have a big impact on the survivability of the US Navy’s most important power projection assets.

SSDS: Current Versions

Role & Ship Types

CEC Concept

CEC Concept
(click to enlarge)

SSDS uses software and commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) electronics to turn incoming data from several systems (radar, radar warning receivers, combat identification, electro-optics) into a single picture of prioritized threats. SSDS will then recommend an engagement sequence for the ship’s crew, or (in automatic mode) fire some combination of jamming transmissions, chaff or decoys, and/or weapons against the oncoming threat. The entire ship’s combat system concept, including the sensors and weapons, is known as Quick Reaction Combat Capability (QRCC) – and SSDS is the key element that ties it all together.

SSDS received Milestone III Approval for Full Rate Production In March 1998, along with authority to eventually integrate with ACDS and Cooperative Engagement Capability (CEC) systems on CVN, LPD-17, LHD and LHA ship classes. Ships with SSDS include:

* SSDS MK1: LSD-41 Whidbey Island Class and LSD-49 Harpers Ferry Class amphibious assault.
* SSDS Mk2 MOD 1: CVN 76 USS Ronald Reagan, March 2003. Probably post-RCOH aircraft carriers from CVN 68 to CVN 71, USS Theodore Roosevelt.
* SSDS Mk2 MOD 2: LPD-17 San Antonio Class amphibious assault.
* SSDS MK2 MOD 3A: LHD 7 USS Iwo Jima & LHD 8 USS Makin Island amphibious assault aviation ships. May be refitted to other Wasp Class LHDs.
* SSDS MK2 MOD 4B: LHA 6 America Class escort carrier, presumably LHA 7 Tripoli too.
* SSDS MK2 MOD 5C: LSD ships to be refitted from SSDS Mk1.
* SSDS MK2 MOD 6B: CVN 78 Gerald R. Ford Class carrier, presumably refitted CVN 72 USS Abraham Lincoln.

SSDS: from MK1 to MK2

RAM Missile

RIM-116 RAM Launch

SSDS MK1 integrates the SPS-49A(V)1 radar, SPS-67(V)1 radar, AN/SLQ-32A/B electronic warfare system, Combat Identification Friend or Foe-Self Defense (CIFFSD), NULKA missile decoy system, Mk 15 Phalanx 20mm Close-In Weapon System, and Rolling Airframe Missile (Mk 49 RAM). It is installed on LSD41/49 class ships, and successfully completed Operational Evaluation in June 1997 aboard USS Ashland [LSD 48].

A technology refresh for these ships will include the MK2 source libraries, new display equipment, and integration with the Battle Force Tactical Trainer (BFTT) and the 20mm Phalanx Block 1B Baseline 2. These systems will be renamed SSDS MK2 Mod 5C. The first LSD is programmed for FY 2014 installation, with IOC in FY 2015.

SAM RIM-162 ESSM Related Systems

ESSM: related systems
(click to view full)

SSDS MK2 leverages critical experiments and reuse of technology and software from SSDS MK1, adds new tactical displays, and integrates new ship self defense elements: the AN/SPQ-9B radar, NATO RIM-7 Sea-sparrow system, and Cooperative Engagement Capability (CEC). Information from Tactical Data Links (Links 4A, 11 and 16) helps it gather and fuse data from other ships, aircraft, and helicopters when creating the overall combat picture.

New MK2 Advanced Capability Builds (ACB) integrate advanced systems such as the Ford Class’ Dual Band Radar, RIM-162 Evolved Sea Sparrow missile, RAM Block 2 missile, SLQ-32 SEWIP Block 2, and data from new MH-60R Seahawk Helicopters.

SSDS MK2 ACB-12/TI-12 development began in FY 2010. It covers the 1st phase of open architecture migration to Category 3 of the U.S. Navy’s OACE standard; common software components for System Track Management and Vehicle Control; integration of system tracking with CEC, Dual Band Radar, ESSM and JUWL up-link, RAM Block 2, and CV-TSC; integration of new interfaces with SEWIP Block 2 ES, MH-60R and Global Command & Control System-Maritime (GCCS-M) via Consolidated-Afloat Network and Enterprise Services (CANES); and common hardware and LAN standards. ACB-12/TI-12 is planned for Initial Operational Capability in the refitted CVN 72 USS Abraham Lincoln and new CVN 78 USS Gerald R. Ford super carriers (SSDS MK2 Mod 6C) in FY 2016, and on the amphibious escort carrier LHA 6 USS America in FY 2017.

Future Improvements

[youtube:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2SHArQEV3iU]

MH-60R Seahawk
click for video

Over the longer term, SSDS MK 2 Pre-Planned Product Improvement (P3I) are adding conversion kits that will replace electronics within SSDS as they become obsolete. The lifespan of electronics is always much shorter than the life-span of the ships. Managing that difference is where the benefits of OACE open architecture/ commercial approaches really shine, by dramatically reducing the cost and difficulty of fielding compatible upgrades.

Another area for improvement was highlighted by a Pentagon testing report released in October 2010. It said that:

“The LPD-17 exhibited difficulty defending itself against several widely proliferated threats, primarily due to… Persistent SSDS Mk 2-based system engineering deficiencies.”

Ouch. In FY 2014, the US Navy took on more responsibility to SSDS hardware, and competitively awarded SSDS hardware design & integration contracts to vendors other than Raytheon. The extent to which this improves overall system engineering remains to be seen.

As of FY 2011, the Navy began working on SSDS MK2 ACB-16/TI-16. Overall, the Navy wants better coordination of available defensive weapons and decoys, as well as better integration with other platforms. Possible ACB-16 inclusions involve hardware upgrades throughout the system, plus SEWIP Block 2 with automated radar designation decoy launch, CIWS and SPS-48G Sensor Integration, more advanced MH-60R integration, Link-16 interoperability improvements, interoperability with new IFF Mode 5/S, interoperability with the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, total ship training capability updates, and GCCSM Data Exchange via CANES.

Note that components of SSDS have migrated to the future combat systems of the USA’s new LCS-2 Independence Class Littoral Combat Ships, and the 14,500t DDG-1000 Zumwalt Class destroyers. To the extent that open architecture hardware and hardware/software engineering allow, improvements in one system could potentially serve as a base for improvements elsewhere. That’s harder to do in practice than it is in theory, but it isn’t impossible.

Contracts & Key Events

Unless otherwise noted, US Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA) in Washington Navy Yard, DC manages the contracts, and Raytheon Integrated Defense Systems in San Diego, CA is the contractor.

FY 2013 – 2018

OT&E office points out continuing issues.

LHA-R

LHA-R/NAAS Concept
(click to view full)

August 19/19: Engineering Support Lockheed Martin won a $56 million deal for combat system engineering support on the Ship Self-Defense System (SSDS). Under the contract, the SSDS combat system engineering agent and software design agent primary deliverables will be SSDS tactical computer programs, program updates and associated engineering, development and logistics products. The contract will manage the in-service SSDS configurations as well as adapt and integrate new or upgraded war-fighting capabilities. Lockheed will perform work in Moorestown, New Jersey and San Diego, California. Estimated completion date is in December.

December 12/18: Mk 2 support Raytheon is being tapped to keep the Navy’s ship self-defense systems (SSDS) running. Awarded by the Naval Sea Systems Command, the contract modification is worth just over $21 million and provides for continued platform systems engineering and agent support of the SSDS Mk 2. The SSDS features an open architecture computing environment software, which includes selected software components from the total ship computing environment infrastructure, and is designed to speed up the process of detecting, tracking and engaging anti-ship cruise missiles. SSDS is installed aboard CVN, LSD, LPD, LHA and LHD classes. Work will be performed at Raytheon’s facility in San Diego, California and is expected to be completed by June 2019.

July 31/14: Hardware. DRS Laurel Technologies in Johnstown, PA receives an initial $497,733 order, under a $31.8 million indefinite-delivery/ indefinite-quantity contract for SSDS Mk2 production hardware, using firm-fixed-priced orders until 2017. The order’s scope includes hardware production, assembly, configuration, alignment, integration, testing and shipping of the SSDS hardware.

There appears to be some overlap with Northrop Grumman’s role, and DID is looking to clarify that. At the same time, note the vastly different size of the initial orders: $12 million vs. $0.5 million.

Work will be performed in Chesapeake, VA (60%) and Johnston, PA (40%), and is expected to be complete by July 2017. This contract was competitively solicited via FBO.gov, with 2 offers received by the US Naval Surface Warfare Center’s Dahlgren Division in Dahlgren, VA (N00178-14-D-3036).

July 22/14: Hardware. Northrop Grumman announces an initial $12 million task order for SSDS MK2 hardware, under a SeaPort-e indefinite-delivery/ indefinite-quantity contract and options that could be worth up to $61 million over 5 years. NGC will provide life cycle engineering, system engineering and integration, and hardware prototype development, while continuing to move the system toward Commercial Off-the Shelf solutions from a wide range of commercial technology vendors.

Raytheon remains in charge of the software, but the hardware ownership by the US Navy and associated contractors is new. This contract continues a decade-long collaboration with the US Navy’s Combat Direction Systems Activity (CDSA) in Dam Neck, VA. It began as an acquisition agent engineering contract to help with the COTS hardware conversion. The firm also retains a separate SSDS operations and maintenance contract with the US Navy Surface Combat Systems Center at Wallops Island, VA.

Northrop Grumman isn’t usually thought of in the same terms as Lockhed Martin, Raytheon, Thales, or Saab for naval combat systems. They actually began building their hardware expertise in the 1980s with Aegis modeling, simulation, and tactical trainers. Their PC-based Open architecture, Reconfigurable Training System (PORTS) started as just a simulator, which is why it didn’t need to use the same expensive, military-proprietary electronics. As the underlying commercial electronics improved exponentially, and NGC’s in-house expertise grew, the door opened to products that could work in real combat environments. The firm’s Track manager and Track server software components are used in AEGIS ACB-12 and in SSDS combat systems; the firm is also deeply involved in the LCS-2 Independence Class’ ICMS open architecture combat system, which has been derived from Thales’ TACTICOS. Sources: NGC, Interviews and “US Navy Selects Northrop Grumman for Ship Self-Defense System”.

Dec 19/13: A $41.6 million cost-plus-incentive-fee contract for FY 2014-2017 SSDS MK2 platform systems engineering agent support, including final development of CVN/Amphibious Modernization ACB-12/TI-12 (Advanced Capability Build 12/Technical Insertion 12).

$13.5 million in FY 2014 R&D funding is committed immediately. Work will be performed in San Diego, CA (99%), and Middletown, RI (1%), and is expected to be complete by September 2017 (N00024-08-C-5122).

March 29/13: A $7.5 million firm-fixed-price contract modification to deliver OL-782(V) SSDS open architecture network switching cabinets for CVN 72 (USS Abraham Lincoln, part of its RCOH), amphibious landing ships LSD 44, 50 & 52, NSWC Dahlgren’s Wallops Island Integrated Combat System Testing Facility, and Raytheon’s Software Integration Lab.

Work will be performed in Portsmouth, RI (80%) and San Diego, CA (20%), and is expected to be complete by October 2014. All funds are committed immediately, using a combination of FY 2011-2013 “Other Procurement” and FY 2012-2013 Shipbuilding and Conversion funds. US Naval Sea Systems Command in Washington, DC manages the contract (N00024-09-C-5100).

Jan 17/13: DOT&E testing. The Pentagon releases the FY 2012 Annual Report from its Office of the Director, Operational Test & Evaluation (DOT&E). The entry for the LPD-17 San Antonio Class recalls DOT&E’s evaluation that the ship isn’t adequately protected, but says:

“…operational testing on other SSDS Mk 2 platforms has revealed similar combat system deficiencies to those found during LPD-17’s IOT&E, confirming these issues are not LPD-17 specific. DOT&E’s classified report to Congress in November 2012 titled “Ship Self-Defense Operational Mission Capability Assessment Report,” provides details. The Navy is conducting a study of Probability of Raid Annihilation against anti-ship cruise missiles and expects to provide their report in the spring of 2013.”

With respect to ship self defense as a general entry encompassing several systems, SSDS-specific recommendations include:

“1. Optimize SSDS Mk 2 weapon employment timelines to maximize weapon probability of kill….

3. Ensure availability of a credible open-loop seeker subsonic ASCM surrogate target for ship self-defense combat system operational tests.

4. Correct the identified SSDS Mk 2 software reliability deficiencies.

5. Correct the identified SSDS Mk 2 training deficiencies.

6. Develop and field deferred SSDS Mk 2 interfaces to the Global Command and Control System–Maritime and the TPX-42A(V) command and control systems.”

Based on the classified information contained in the November 2012 report to Congress, DOT&E recommends that the Navy:

“Improve the SSDS Mk 2 integration with the Mk 9 Track Illuminators to better support ESSM [RIM-162 Evolved Sea Sparrow Missile] engagements, as well as preventing the Mk 9 Track Illuminators from contributing to the composite track during certain threat raid types.”

Dec 19/12: FY 2013 development. A $16 million cost-plus-award-fee contract modification, exercising FY 2013 options for continuation of Ship Self Defense System (SSDS) MK2 development, and test for CVN 78 and SSDS MK1 technology refresh efforts.

All contract funds are committed immediately. Work will be performed in San Diego, CA (90%); Tewksbury, MA (2.5%); Portsmouth, RI (2.5%); St. Petersburg, FL (2.5%); and Tucson, AZ (2.5%), and is expected to be complete by September 2013 (N00024-08-C-5122).

Nov 5/12: PSEA. Raytheon announces a $22.5 million US Navy contract to continue SSDS system development, test and integration, while remaining in its 2008-2012 role as Platform Systems Engineering Agent (PSEA) services and fleet support. The Navy has also announced its intent to increase the current PSEA contract ceiling by $50 million, to extend SSDS services and support through FY 2013.

Raytheon offers an update concerning overall system progress:

“…LHA [LHA-6 USS America] variant is nearing initial deployment, a technical refresh of the LSD-class is almost complete, and system development is underway for the new CVN 78-class of aircraft carriers… recent delivery brought the total number of systems to 31, all of which were delivered early or on time. Work on SSDS is performed at Raytheon Integrated Defense System’s Expeditionary Warfare Center, San Diego, Calif.; and Seapower Capability Center, Portsmouth, R.I.”

FY 2012

CSEA RFP. Early work on CVN 79. Automated tests could help alleviate software issues.

LPD-17 Class Concept

LPD-17 & ATF concept
(click to view full)

Sept. 18/12: NAVSEA issues a presolicitation for its future Combat System Engineering Agent (CSEA) efforts (see December 2011 entry) that so far have been undertaken by incumbent Raytheon IDS. The anticipated requirements include systems and software engineering, development of engineering products to support combat system integration, configuration control, developmental test/operational test (DT/OT) support, training and logistics support, and field technical support for designated combat systems. The systems engineering, development, and integration work will begin with Advanced Capability Build (ACB) 16 development and integration on Technology Insertion (TI) 12 and followed by ACB 16 integration on TI 16.

An industry day takes place on Sept. 27, with Q&As and pre-RFP material added to FBO and NECO in the following months. The release date of the final RFP is not yet known. FBO.

Aug 30/12: A $6.6 million firm-fixed-price contract modification for FY 2012 long-lead material, and end-of-life commercial-off-the-shelf parts for SSDS MK2 network switching cabinets. That way, the Navy will have enough, even after this configuration is no longer produced.

Work will be performed in San Diego, CA (50%), and Portsmouth, RI (50%), and is expected to be complete by March 2014 (N00024-09-C-5100).

Aug 23/12: A $22.5 million modification to existing contract N00024-08-C-5122 exercises FY12 options to continue SSDS MK 2 development, and tests for CVN 78 and SSDS MK1 technology refresh efforts. Work will be performed in San Diego, CA (90%), Tewksbury, MA (5%), and Portsmouth, RI (5%), and is expected to be completed by August 2013.

Feb 27/12: FY 2013 Budget. The FY2013 Presidential Budget features close to $91M for 1 SSDS system for PCU John F. Kennedy [CVN 79]. It’s a rather early timing given that carrier’s earliest delivery is scheduled for September 2022, but construction has started, and combat systems are one of the early items. The hardware itself is budgeted at $17.4 million, with a contractor and contract type left to be determined.

USS Abraham Lincoln [CVN 72] also has a $47.7 million entry, reflecting its planned RCOH mid-life overhaul.

December 2011: During the NDIA conference on integrated warfare systems, Capt. Jon Hill, a Major Program Manager, Integrated Combat Systems (AEGIS) within PEO IWS said that the CSEA role for SSDS would be the object of a late 2012 RFP, with a 2014 award.

He also noted that the development of automated tests was a key area of focus. Complex software systems cannot be tested solely manually, especially when you are shooting at a moving target. AEGIS is going through so-called Advanced Capability Builds (ACBs) with an underlying evolving hardware platform, software changes and new functional expectations. These presentations on the Surface Navy’s combat system explain it well: May 2010: Deegan on AEGIS OA [PDF] | April 2011: Bray on AEGIS [PDF]. | Capt. Hill [PDF].

Jan 16/12: Raytheon announces that it has delivered the final FY 2010 SSDS MK2 hardware ship set, 1 of 5 for the year. This 5th system is slated for new-build installation and integration aboard the John P. Murtha [LPD 26]. bringing the SSDS program total to 30. Raytheon says that all of them have been delivered early.

Jan 09/12: DOTE. The annual report of the Annual Report of the Office of the Director, Operational Test & Evaluation is out. On Ship Self Defense [PDF], it states that some of the issues raised earlier persist, and plague all CVN 68, LHD-1, and LPD-17 ship class combat systems, given their commonalities [PDF]. Among recommendations: fix the SSDS software.

Nov 29/11: A $7.2 million cost-plus-fixed-fee, cost-plus-award-fee contract modification, exercising FY 2012 options for SSDS PSEA work. Work will be performed in San Diego, CA (90%); Tewksbury, MA (5%); and Portsmouth, RI (5%), and is expected to be complete by September 2012 (N00024-08-C-5122).

FY 2010 – 2011

Quality concerns.

Aug 11/11: CACI Technologies, Inc. in Chantilly, VA received a $24.2 million contract modification for professional engineering, technical, training, software, project service, logistics services, fleet modernization, internal communication systems, combat system switchboard and other in-service engineering agent products necessary to support SSDS at shore sites, land-based test facilities, shipyards, and aboard ships in port and at sea. This contract modification exercises an option that brings the cumulative value to $48.3 million.

Work will be performed in Port Hueneme, CA (35%); Wallops Island, VA (10%); Norfolk, VA (5%); Crystal City, VA (10%); San Diego, CA (5%); Little Creek, VA (5%); Pearl Harbor, Hawaii (5%); and other shore and afloat sites (25%). Work is expected to be complete by February 2012. $2.3 million will expire at the end of the current fiscal year, on Sept 30/11. The US Naval Surface Warfare Center;s Port Hueneme Division in Port Hueneme, CA manages the contract (N63394-04-D-1262).

Aug 9/11: Raytheon IDS in San Diego, CA received a $7.9 million firm-fixed-price contract modification for the FY 2011 buy of 2 SSDS MK2 open architecture computing environment kits, destined for retrofit into the USS Wasp [LHD 1] and installation in the future LPD-27 San Antonio Class ship. Each set consists of 4 switch server cabinets, 4 input/output cabinets, 4 general processor cabinets, and 1 connector kit.

Work will be performed in San Diego, CA (50%), and Portsmouth, RI (50%), and is expected to be complete by October 2012 (N00024-09-C-5100).

June 15/11: Raytheon ISD in San Diego, CA received a $9 million cost-plus-fixed-fee and cost-plus-award-fee contract modification, exercising options for FY 2011 SSDS platform systems engineering. That funds continuation of SSDS pre- and post-certification work, life-cycle maintenance support services, SSDS MK2 modification work, and integration support for CVN 78 Gerald R. Ford’s SSDS MK 1 upgrade to the OA baseline.

Work will be performed in San Diego, CA (90%), Tewksbury, MA (5%), and Portsmouth, RI (5%), and will run until FY 2011 ends, at the end of September 2011, when $2.5 million will expire (N00024-08-C-5122).

FY09 report

FY 2009 DOT&E report
(click to read)

Oct 28/10: SSDS quality questioned by Pentagon. Bloomberg News reports on a classified report sent to Congress in June 2010, outlining Pentagon testing that found serious issues with the LPD-17 San Antonio Class’ ability to survive combat situations. Their article is based on an unclassified summary of that report, and an email response from Michael Gilmore, the Pentagon’s director of operational test and evaluation, who described the ships as “not effective, suitable and not survivable in a combat situation.” The core of those reports is that the ships continue to experience widespread, persistent engineering problems, and couldn’t continue to operate reliably after being hit by enemy fire, in part because of the engineering problems mentioned. From the Pentagon’s DOT&E FY 2009 Annual Report:

“Chronic reliability problems associated with critical ship systems across the spectrum of mission areas reduces overall ship suitability and jeopardizes mission accomplishment… Emerging results from [Navy] trials indicate the ships could not demonstrate the required levels of survivability, largely because of critical ship system failures after weapons effects… The LPD-17 exhibited difficulty defending itself against several widely proliferated threats, primarily due to… Persistent SSDS Mk 2-based system engineering deficiencies… The ship’s RAM system provided the only hard kill capability, preventing layered air defense [DID: in fairness, the ships were designed this way]… Problems associated with SPS-48E and SPQ-9B radar performance against certain Anti-Ship Cruise Missile attack profiles [DID: also a known design limitation]… Degraded situational awareness due to Mk 46 [30mm remotely-operated] Gun Weapon System console configuration… The survivability of the San Antonio class ships appear to be improved over the LPD class ships they will replace. However, problems encountered with critical systems during testing (particularly with the electrical distribution, chilled water, SWAN, and ECS) and difficulty recovering mission capability may offset some of the survivability improvements and have highlighted serious reliability shortcomings.”

See: Pentagon DOT&E FY 2009 [PDF].

SSDS concerns

April 7/10: A $14.2 million modification to previously awarded firm-fixed-price contract (N00024-09-C-5100) for the production of 5 fiscal 2010 SSDS MK 2 Open Architecture Computing Environment (OACE) kits. The kits include cabinets, processors, converters, network devices, and interface units. The equipment sets consolidate the computing and interface requirements for the SSDS ship class variants.

The fiscal 2010 kits will be installed at the Naval Air Systems Command land-based test site and on the carriers USS Harry S. Truman [CVN 75] and USS Gerald R. Ford [CVN 78], the amphibious transport ship LPD 26 (not yet named), and the amphibious assault ship LHA 7 (not yet named). Work will be performed in San Diego, CA (50%), and Portsmouth, RI (50%), and is expected to be complete by January 2012. Raytheon release.

March 15/10: A $7.5 million modification to a previously awarded contract (N00024-08-C-5122), exercising FY 2010 options to continue as the platform system engineering agent for the Ship Self Defense System. Work will be performed in San Diego (90%); Tewksbury, MA (2.5%); Portsmouth, RI (2.5%); St. Petersburg, FL (2.5%); and Tucson, AZ (2.5%). Work is expected to be complete by September 2010.

Once again, integration with the new Gerald R. Ford Class aircraft carriers’ Dual Band Radar, and the improved RIM-116 Rolling Airframe Missile Block 2, are key tasks, alongside the usual work of testing and provide certification support for the SSDS, which is provided to shipbuilders as Government-Furnished Equipment.

Dec 30/09: A $10.8 million modification to a previously awarded cost-plus-fixed-fee contract, exercising FY 2010 options to continue as the platform system engineering agent for the Ship Self Defense System.

Work will be performed in San Diego, CA (90%); Tewksbury, MA (2.5%); Portsmouth, RI (2.5%); St. Petersburg, FL (2.5%); and Tucson, AZ (2.5%). Work is expected to be complete by Sept 30/10 (N00024-08-C-5122).

Nov 2/09: A $6.7 million modification to contract N00024-08-C-5122 exercises a FY 2010 option for performing as the SSDS platform system engineering agent. Once again, integration with the CVN-21 ships’ Dual Band Radar, and the improved RIM-116 Rolling Airframe Missile Block 2, are key tasks.

Work will be performed in San Diego, CA (90%); Tewksbury, MA (2.5%); Portsmouth, RI (2.5%); St. Petersburg, FL (2.5%); and Tucson, AZ (2.5%), and is expected to be complete by November 2010.

FY 2008 – 2009

1st Mk2 delivery; OACE kits.

Sept 2/09: A $9.6 million modification to a previously awarded contract for SSDS platform system engineering agent services (N00024-08-C-5122). Work will be performed in San Diego, CA (90%); Tewksbury, MA (2.5%); Portsmouth, RI (2.5%); St. Petersburg, FL (2.5%); and Tucson, AZ (2.5%) and is expected to be complete by January 2010 (N00024-08-C-5122).

Raytheon IDS will be responsible for the integration of complex war-fighting improvements – including compatibility with the CVN-21 ships’ Dual Band Radar, and the improved RIM-116 Rolling Airframe Missile Block 2 – into the modular SSDS. Raytheon IDS will integrate, test and provide certification support for the government-furnished equipment/ government-furnished information required for the CVN/ amphibious ship combat system. See also Aug 10/09 and Sept 30/08 entries, and the Raytheon release.

Aug 13/09: CACI Technologies, Inc. in Chantilly, VA received an $18.2 million modification to a previously awarded contract (N63394-04-D-1262) for engineering and technical support services, training, software, project and logistics services, and products necessary to support the Ship Self Defense System. Services will be required at shore sites, land-based test facilities, shipyards, and aboard ships in ports and at sea.

Work will be performed in Port Hueneme, CA (35%); Wallops Island, VA (20%); Crystal City, VA (20%); San Diego, CA (10%); Little Creek, VA (10%); and Pearl Harbor, Hawaii (5%), and is expected to be complete by April 2010. Contract funds in the amount of $4.4 million will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Surface Warfare Center in Port Hueneme, CA manages the contract.

Aug 10/09: A $7.4 million modification, finalizing a previously-awarded letter contract (N00024-08-C-5122) to integrate “complex war-fighting improvements” into SSDS, as the platform’s system engineering agent.

Work will be performed in San Diego, CA (90%); Tewksbury, MA (2.5%); Portsmouth, RI (2.5%); St. Petersburg, FL (2.5%); and Tucson, AZ (2.5%), and is expected to be complete by September 2009. Contract funds in the amount of $394,546 will expire at the end of the current fiscal year, on Sept 30/09.

Dec 23/08: A $14.9 million fixed price contract for 3 SSDS MK2 Open Architecture Computing Environment (OACE) kits. The SSDS MK2 OACE kits include cabinets, processors, converters, network devices and interface units.

These FY 2009 kits will be installed on the new amphibious assault ship USS New Orleans [LPD 18], the carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower [CVN 69], and the navy’s Self Defense Test Ship (SDTS). Work will be performed in San Diego, CA (50%) and Portsmouth, RI (50%). Since SSDS is already an established standard system, this contract was not competitively procured (N00024-09-C-5100).

Dec 12/08: An $8 million modification to a previously awarded contract (N00024-08-C-5122), exercising options for SSDS FY 2009 MK 1 Technology Refresh Support Services; Pre/Post Certification/Life Cycle Maintenance Support Services; Engineering Change/Field Change Kits, Commercial Off the Shelf Obsolescence Engineering and Diminishing Manufacturing Sources and Material Shortages.

In the course of this effort, Raytheon IDS will be responsible integrating components associated with the Dual Band Radar (DBR) and Rolling Airframe Missile (RAM) Block 2 into the modular SSDS. These systems are closely associated with America’s new CVN-21/Gerald R. Ford Class carriers, though the RAM Block II will also serve on a number of other American ship classes.

Work will be performed in San Diego, CA (90%); Tewksbury, MA (2.5%); Portsmouth, RI, (2.5%); St. Petersburg, FL (2.5%); and Tucson, AZ (2.5%), and is expected to be complete by September 2009.

Nov 7/08: A $7.2 million modification to previously awarded contract N00024-08-C-5122, exercising an option for SSDS pre- and post-certification /life-cycle maintenance support services. Work will be performed in San Diego, CA (90%); Tewksbury, MA (2.5%); Portsmouth, RI (2.5%); St. Petersburg, FL (2.5%); and Tucson, AZ (2.5%), and is expected to be complete by September 2009. Contract funds in the amount of $7.2 million will expire at the end of the current fiscal year.

Sept 30/08: An $8.3 million cost-plus fixed-fee letter contract to act as the SSDS Platform System Engineering Agent. The contractor will be responsible for the integration of complex war-fighting improvements into the modular SSDS, including components associated with the new Gerald R. Ford Class carrier’s Dual Band Radar (DBR), and with the popular Rolling Airframe Missile (RAM) Block 2.

Work will be performed in San Diego, CA (90%); Tewksbury, MA (2.5%); Portsmouth, RI (2.5%); St. Petersburg, FL (2.5%); and Tucson, AZ (2.5%), and is expected to be completed by April 2009. This contract was not competitively procured (N00024-08-C-5122).

July 14/08: Raytheon announces its first delivery of its open architecture SSDS Mk 2 hardware configuration for installation onboard the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz [CVN 68]. Warfare system integration and interoperability testing are complete, and, Raytheon delivered the hardware 3 weeks ahead of schedule.

SSDS Mk2 is designed to meet the US Navy’s Program Executive Office Integrated Warfare Systems (PEO-IWS) Open Architecture Computing Environment standards, which leverage some of the systems designed for the DDG-1000 Zumwalt Class destroyer’s Total Ship Computing Environment infrastructure.

1st Mk2 delivery

Jan 30/08: Raytheon Co. Integrated Defense Systems in San Diego, CA received a $17.3 million modification to previously awarded contract (N00024-07-C-5105) for FY 2008 production of 4 SSDS MK 2 Tactical Ship Sets. They will also conduct a special study to define engineering changes to the SSDS MK 2 product baseline in support of Combat System configuration on the first-of-class LHA 6, the US Marines new LHA-R ship that supports amphibious assault and functions as a mid-size aircraft carrier.

Work will be performed in Portsmouth, RI, and is expected to be complete by Oct. 2009. This contract was not competitively procured.

Additional Readings

* US Navy – SSDS. 2010 snapshot.

* Raytheon – Ship Self Defense System.

* USN PEO-IWS (April 11/11) – Surface Navy Combat System Development Update [PDF]. Presented to The Navy League Sea Air and Space Symposium by Bill Bray. SSDS features prominently, due to its re-use of common source libraries.

* Naval Engineers (June 4/10) – A Systems Engineering Approach to Commonality across Surface Ship Combat Systems (Requirements and Architecture) [PDF]. Conceptual.

* Hanscom AFB Integrator magazine (Oct 16/06) – U.S. Navy launches virtual library to help reuse code. As of January 2007, assets and artifacts from the Aegis, Ship Self Defense System (SSDS), Littoral Combat Ship (LCS), and DDG-1000 programs are available in the SHARE library.

One Source: Hundreds of programs; Thousands of links, photos, and analyses

DII brings a complete collection of articles with original reporting and research, and expert analyses of events to your desktop – no need for multiple modules, or complex subscriptions. All supporting documents, links, & appendices accompany each article.

Benefits

  • Save time
  • Eliminate your blind spots
  • Get the big picture, quickly
  • Keep up with the important facts
  • Stay on top of your projects or your competitors

Features

  • Coverage of procurement and doctrine issues
  • Timeline of past and future program events
  • Comprehensive links to other useful resources